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Obvious not invented

A. S. Goustin Lab hivlab at CMB.BIOSCI.WAYNE.EDU
Mon May 18 16:10:15 EST 1998


Wouldn't it be useful to dissect signal transduction pathways to have a
peptide substrate (or peptide substrate mimetic) which would emit an
altered fluorescence (band-shifted) depending on its state of
phosphorylation?

For example, a substrate for a MAP kinase which might fluoresce at 480 nm
when unphosphorylated and at 570 nm when phosphorylated?

I would imagine that such a substrate has been imagined, but I have not
been able to find it in the literature.

Reverse precedents exist in a manner of speaking, substrates for
phosphatases which emit light (luminescence) when the phosphate is removed
(by a phosphatase).  For example, CDP-star from Tropix, Inc:

     http://www.tropix.com

a company which also has luminescent substrates for b-gal and
beta-glucuronidase.

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Anton Scott Goustin, Ph.D.                         *     *         *
Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics                 *     
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"IT IS KNOWN THAT NATURE WORKS CONSTANTLY WITH THE SAME MATERIALS.  SHE
IS INGENIOUS TO VARY ONLY THE FORMS."  --E. Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, 1807
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